Tag: #WINGS4YOUTH

Happy Mother’s Day! Today, in celebration of all mothers who impacted our lives, we’re sharing another story from our series: 15 stories for the 15th Anniversary!

FIFTEEN STORIES

WINGS’ mobile clinics travel to remote areas of Guatemala, where access to health services is extremely limited. During the clinics, we provide contraceptive methods, cervical cancer screenings and cryotherapy treatment. In many Guatemalan communities, family planning or anything related to reproductive health is still much stigmatized, so it takes courage for women from these villages to go to our clinics. We have met strong women who have overcome many struggles, as is the case with Ana Maria.

25-year-old Ana Maria was born in Nicaragua. Both her parents died when she was a child, and without family or opportunities, she came to Guatemala, told by a prospective employer he would provide her steady work and a place to live. At just 14, Ana Maria was sold into the sex slave industry, and obligated to pay off her travel and housing debts. After 3 months living a nightmare, Ana Maria managed to escape with the help of a friend, now her husband.

Ana Maria

A few years later, Ana Maria went to a WINGS talk about family planning and cervical cancer. The risk factors for cervical cancer really concerned her, considering her past. Ana Maria wanted to undergo a screening, but worried about the cost; her husband works on a banana plantation and some months they barely have enough money to feed their 3 children. WINGS nurse Alejandra heard Ana Maria’s concerns, and offered to waive the fee for the screening. Unfortunately, Ana Maria’s screening results came out positive for pre-cancerous cells. WINGS’ staff provided Ana Maria with immediate cryotherapy treatment that day, to prevent precancerous lesions progressing to cervical cancer. With tears running down her face, Ana Maria said: “I could never afford this treatment. Sometimes we don’t even have enough to eat. I thank God that there are organizations providing services to the poorest people.”

Ana Maria’s three children and her husband were also very grateful to WINGS. The children are still very young, and with their father busy working at the plantation during the day, Ana Maria is their main caretaker. Thanks to the cervical cancer screening and treatment, Ana Maria got the opportunity to be with her three children and see them grow up.

Women listening to WINGS talk

Women listening to WINGS’ talk about cervical cancer

Ana Maria was very lucky. WINGS provided her with cervical cancer screening and cryotherapy treatment in time and she avoided developing cervical cancer. But what happens to all the women living in remote, rural area of Guatemala where access to health services is almost nonexistent? In many cases, these women have never attended a talk about cervical cancer and they don’t even realize they may be at risk. As a result, they do not get screened and there is a higher chance for cervical cancer to develop. If caught early, cervical cancer is highly preventable and treatable. It should not be the number one cause of cancer-related deaths in Guatemalan women.

This is where we are asking you to step in. We are aiming to screen almost 4,000 women for cervical cancer this year and you can help us make this happen. Join our Mother’s Day campaign today and make a donation to WINGS in the name of the mother you wish to honor. We will send you a beautiful personalized card for her, explaining the impact her Mother’s Day gift is making. Help us save lives!

 

When we think of adolescence, we tend to associate it with a period of discovery and change: growing closer to certain friends, becoming interested in different hobbies, hitting puberty, and transitioning from childhood to adulthood. In Guatemala however, the reality for many teenage girls is sadly very different. Due to lack of sexual education, sociocultural norms, and limited access to birth control, 22% of girls in Guatemala give birth before the age of 18, forcing them into adulthood too quickly. Guatemala has one of the highest teenage pregnancy rates in Latin America and the Caribbean and is the only country in Central America where teenage pregnancy is actually on the rise.

Through its Youth Program, WINGS seeks to prevent teenage pregnancies in Guatemala and enable girls and boys to decide about their health and futures. Our program combines youth led sexual education with free sexual and reproductive health services in remote communities.

In a recent mobile clinic in San Francisco Zapotitlán, on the country’s Pacific coast, we met 21-year-old Fabiola.

Fabiola 21, 3 children

Born in San Francisco Zapotitlán, Fabiola is one of seven siblings. Her mother sold vegetables and fruit in the local market to provide for her children. While her mother was working, Fabiola was in charge of the house, taking care of her younger brothers and sisters, despite being a child herself. As in many Guatemalan families, nobody ever told Fabiola about birth control. When she was 18, Fabiola had her first child. She struggled because on top of looking out for her younger siblings, she now had her own baby to take care of. At 19, Fabiola had her second child. Today, Fabiola is 21 years old and has three children. Raising her three children has not been easy: “Being a mother is a beautiful thing, but sometimes I feel like I can barely manage. I can’t afford to provide my children with everything I’d like to give them, and when they get sick, I can’t sleep because I’m worried about their well-being”. 

Days before the mobile clinic, our Field Supervisor Mylin visited women in San Francisco Zapotitlán to talk about their family planning options and encourage them to attend our mobile clinic. Although Fabiola showed up, she was very scared about using birth control. In San Francisco as in many Guatemalan communities, birth control is highly stigmatized. While she was afraid that her community would judge her, Fabiola knew that she could not afford to have more children. After discussing which contraceptive options we could offer her, Fabiola chose the subdermal hormonal implant, which provides up to 5 years of protection. Fabiola said she is grateful to WINGS because now she does not have to worry about becoming pregnant again and she is ready to dedicate all her time to raising her three boys. “WINGS is one of the few organizations that has reached out to women in my community. Many of us do not have enough money to go to a big hospital and pay for expensive services. Once I told the nurses I did not have enough money for the implant, they gave it to me for free!”

Young mothers at WINGS' clinic

Young mothers at WINGS’ clinic

During the mobile clinic, we also met Berta, a 19-year-old girl who carried her 10-month-old baby in her arms. Berta too had never learned about birth control – not even in school where teachers are legally required to provide sexual education. When Berta was 5 years old, her mother passed away. She was raised by her aunts and her father. Her family is very religious, and she was not allowed to ask any questions related to sexuality. She was very surprised when she got pregnant, as was all her family. A friend of her late mother told Berta about the mobile clinic, so Berta came in to get a subdermal hormonal implant. Berta may want to have one other child in the future, but she is happy that she now gets to choose when she is ready for that.

Berta (19) and her 10-month-old son

Berta, 19, with her 10-month-old son

When asked whether she was excited about Mother’s Day, Berta’s face lit up and a huge smile spread across her face. “Yes! You know, once my own mother died, I lost all hope of ever being able to say ‘Happy Mother’s Day’ again. But now, for the first time in my life, people will be saying that to me. Even though I didn’t plan to be a mother this early, I love my son and I want to be the best mother in the world for him.”

GUA MAY 2015 WINGS Santo Tomas, Isabela, 18, with son Andy 1

18-year-old mother Isabela breastfeeds her 1-year-old son Andy at one of WINGS’ mobile clinics

 

This Mother’s Day, you can support women like Fabiola and Berta by donating to WINGS. Give a meaningful gift to a special mom today and save lives!

Visit www.wingsguate.org/mothers-day-2016 to learn more about our Mother’s Day Campaign.

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Use the arrows above to look through the image gallery from WINGS Youth Leaders’ training.

What is the Youth Leaders Program?

WINGS’ Youth Leaders program trains young men and women from ages 14 to 19 so they can provide accurate reproductive health information and service referrals to their peers through community-based activities. Our methodology incorporates the topics of gender equality and power.

Why Youth?

In Guatemala, many children do not finish their education; most only go up to third grade and then start working in order to support their families. Some sell fruits and vegetables in “mercados”, some work with crops in the fields, and others shine shoes for a living. In this environment with scarce opportunities or access to schooling, children grow up knowing little about their own rights and their health. For children who do continue their education in the public school system, the picture does not get much better. Though Guatemalan legislation states that public schools must teach family planning and reproductive health topics, the culture remains very conservative and sexual health is still taboo, hence in most schools, these topics are not even mentioned. Not knowing much about reproductive health or contraception options, many girls become pregnant at 15 or earlier.

Additionally, Guatemala is a very patriarchal society where women’s voices are frequently silenced, especially in rural areas, where traditional gender roles are still very prevalent. Sadly, violence against girls and women is common. There are many pregnancies that happen as a result of rape, sometimes by girls’ own relatives.

At WINGS we believe in promoting equal rights and we know it is imperative for youth to receive an education. Unintended adolescent pregnancies can be avoided through reproductive health education and access to contraceptive methods. By informing youth about their reproductive rights, we can reduce teen pregnancies, increasing girls likelihood to continue their education, and pursue their future goals.

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Why WINGS is off to a GREAT start in 2016!

Just in January, we have already held two Youth Leader training sessions, one in Cobán and the other in our Antigua office. In total, we trained sixty young men and women. Both sessions were a huge success; the adolescents asked great questions, gave important feedback, and were willing to participate in all our fun activities. Even those who were shy at first warmed up to the topics and to their peers. WINGS’ staff taught the youth about the contraceptive methods we offer. To make sure that the youth understood, they got into smaller groups to make presentations about each method, with banners and demonstrations about how to use each. To keep the activities fun and dynamic, we held rallies so that the youth could run outside and play while learning. In addition to talking about contraceptive methods and how to use them, we also talked about reproductive rights, gender equality, and sexual orientation. We are aware that Guatemala is still a very traditional society, so it is important that from a very young age, our youth learn to respect all types of diversity. It was great to see that despite having been brought up in a conservative culture, the youth readily accepted these topics.

New Year, New Methodology!

This past year, we noticed some very important numbers. Out of all the 14-19 year old adolescents we work with, 81% chose short term contraception, while only 19% choose LARCs (long-acting reversible contraception), even though the latter are the most effective.

This year we implemented the LARCs First methodology. We explain all available birth control methods in terms of efficacy: beginning with the most effective (IUD and subdermal implant) and ending with the least effective method (condom). There are numerous misconceptions about LARCs in Guatemala: it is believed that they are only meant to be used by married women or women who have already had children, some think that they can make women infertile,   or that they are permanent methods. For this reason, during our training program we strongly emphasize these contraceptive methods can be used by women regardless of whether they have had kids or not, and that they can be removed after 5 years (in case of the implant) or 10 (IUD), or earlier if the person decides to.

Meet our Youth Leaders!

Our Youth Leaders program is made up of many intelligent, determined youth who bring such positive energy and hope to the work WINGS does.

* Click on the “CC” button to watch with English subtitles

Here is an interview with one of our newest Youth Leaders, Samuel. Samuel talks about why youth are embarrassed to talk about sex, why adolescent pregnancies are so frequent in Guatemala, and what his dreams for the future are.

It is thanks to your support that WINGS Youth Leaders Program became reality. Please continue empowering youth in Guatemala by making a tax-deductible contribution to WINGS.

We are thrilled to share a blog post written for CAMY and WINGS by our Youth Specialist in Cobán, Alta Verapaz, 23-year-old Fidelia Chub. Read on to learn about WINGS’ work with youth and the fight to engage local authorities in protecting young people and their rights.

To support WINGS’ work with youth, make a tax-deductible contribution to our #WINGS4YOUTH year-end campaign and change young lives! 

FIDELIABlog post written by Fidelia Chub, Youth Specialist for WINGS Guatemala ©Photo by WINGS

On October 5th, Emily Barcklow, Central America & Mexico Youth Fund (CAMY) Program Officer and Gloria Diaz Jaso, CAMY Scholarship Recipient, joined WINGS on a visit to San José, a semi- urban community 10 minutes outside Cobán, Alta Verapaz. They were able to attend an informational talk for youth in the community given by Byron de La Cruz, a WINGS’ Youth leader. Byron began volunteering earlier this year as Youth Leader in our project supported by CAMY due to his desire to help his peers avoid teenage pregnancies.

Byron WorkshopByron gives a talk about teenage pregnancy prevention ©Photo by CAMY Fund

By the time we arrived, 11 young women and men had showed up to listen to Byron’s talk. The topic for the workshop was, “Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention, Reproductive Risk and Family Planning.” Byron had asked a local family if he could host the talk in their backyard and they were more than happy to let the youth use the space. During the talk, the youth who arrived were very active and participative, asking questions when they had doubts.

un-asistente-colocando-el-condónCondom use demonstration ©Photo by CAMY Fund

Upon returning to the WINGS office, Emily, Gloria and I talked about several areas of improvement and plans to continue with the current project. Something that we recognized was the diversity of young people in the area because the ones who attended to the talk that day were completely different from the girls from a Tanchí village that CAMY visited in March: the girls from the village were timid and had trouble expressing themselves. We concluded that when you are close to the municipal capital, you have greater opportunities to receive information which makes youth in those areas more active. Thus, it’s necessary to make sure the same information and services exist at the community level to promote development not just for one group, but for all people.

We also talked about other project activities completed in the last few months. For example, in August and September we organized advocacy activities in various municipalities to celebrate International Youth Day and the Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Day.

In August, we also participated in the regional meeting for youth and teenagers called “Advocating for My Rights” in partnership with Plan International, the Network of Youth Organizations of Alta Verapaz (ROJAV), Youth Bureau of Cobán, Paz Jóven, and Social Cooperation Institute (ICOS). Several youth from the participating institutions joined WINGS’ youth leaders in the meeting. This two day event included a rally, artistic activities, and a forum with the local authorities and aspiring congressional deputies, to motivate young people and the invitees.

rallyYouth Rally in Cobán. ©Photo by CAMY Fund

During the meeting, two forums were hosted – the first one with Ministry of Health and Municipal Youth Office representatives, and the second with four deputies participating in the October election. The youth were very engaged and asked the various representatives and aspiring politicians, “what have you done to prevent teenage pregnancies?” and “what will you do to support youth if you are elected to the Congress?” This was a productive space for the youth to advocate for their rights in front of local authorities and future congressional figures.

autoridades-en-el-foro

©Photo by CAMY Fund

Similarly, during September and October we hosted a roundtable discussion in San Cristobal Verapaz with local authorities. Although we had organized roundtable discussions in Santa Cruz Chisec, the local authorities did not arrive. Seeing the lack of interest from local authorities was extremely discouraging to the youth and teachers participating in the roundtables.

Some of our Youth Leaders expressed disappointment because some local leaders do not have any interest in young people and do not want to invest in youth. We realize how important it is to continue informing and sensitizing young people about the rights and existing laws that protect them. We agreed that next year, we will continue implement advocacy activities to show the authorities that now young people are demanding their rights.

Thanks to Nicole A. Otis and Clara Avila for helping with the translation!

Don’t forget to visit #WINGS4YOUTH campaign page and give a gift that gives back!Slide2 WINGS4Youth

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